What obligation is there to be moral? Part 3

Part 3 of a three part series. Pt1. Pt2. Required obligations? Which things need to be committed to (if any)? In other words, if "something being obligatory" means that it is required for something else, which kinds of "something else" must we be required to commit to in the first place? Are there any kinds of …

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What obligation is there to be moral? Part 2

Part 2 of a three part series. Pt1. Pt3. What compels? What can compel an obligation? In other words, what consequence is the force which makes an obligation compelling? If a commitment is social, compulsion might be derived by force of a social nature (e.g. social penalties like lower social status, group exclusion, etc.). If …

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South Korea’s dog meat trade

CNN calls South Korea's dog meat trade "brutal" ...Yes, but what is the difference between South Korean dogs and "our food animals"? https://edition.cnn.com/2018/02/10/opinions/kaye-dog-meat-farming-south-korea/index.html?sr=twCNN021018kaye-dog-meat-farming-south-korea1224PMVODtop In the CNN article, which talks about South Korea's legal dog meat trade, you could replace the word "dog" with "cow", "pig", "chicken", etc, and similarly discuss Australian animals. Over 1000 animals …

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The good, bad, and ugly of the abolitionist approach to animal rights

The effectiveness of and truth (or falsity) behind Francione's vegan advocacy Gary Francione (click for full biography) is an American professor of law and philosophy at Rutgers University. He has contributed to the animal rights movement with books, podcasts, speeches, radio and television spots, and increasingly with social media and webinars. He, along with his partner …

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Child, theist, athiest, nihilist: A personal evolution.

From child to belief in God I was raised in a non-religious household, and enrolled in a Catholic primary school for my first three years. Our class attended the on-site church weekly and was taught how to pray. We were encouraged to believe in the Christian God, and the authority of the school and rituals …

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